Terrazas de los Andes

The Spirit of Los Aromos

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From silkiness to structure, the secret of the best Cabernet-Sauvignon.

The Spirit of Los Aromos

A walk to the top

As vineyardists, altitude has always been at the center of our work. That is why we carefully chose the most adapted altitude for each grape variety, providing them with the perfect natural conditions to thrive.

A walk to the top

Chardonnay’s ideal serving temperature

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🌡 10-12 degrees

Chardonnay’s ideal serving temperature

Tasting at the winery

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Because a single sip tells volumes. 🍷

Tasting at the winery

Dessert anyone ?

Fresh apples, a bit of sugar, a fire pit. Simple things are always the best. 😉

Dessert anyone ?

5 years of rain in Mendoza = 1 year in Bordeaux

In Bordeaux, it rains about 1000mm per year.

In Napa Valley, rainfall reaches about 500mm per year.

Mendoza’s 200mm of annual rainfall means a naturally healthy vine and more concentrated fruit. 🍇

5 years of rain in Mendoza = 1 year in Bordeaux

The Spirit of Reserva Malbec

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Malbec’s long odyssey, from the Andes to your best moments. Made with passion.

The Spirit of Reserva Malbec

A taste of Torrontès

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A fresh, floral and elegant white wine.

A taste of Torrontès

Enjoy Your Beef with Malbec

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Asado-style beef at the winery, best enjoyed with a glass of Reserva Malbec. 🔥

Enjoy Your Beef with Malbec

With patience comes excellence

Our estate wines spend 20 months ageing in a new French oak barrel, almost twice the time of an average Malbec.

With patience comes excellence

Chardonnay harvest

In the first week of March, we handpick Chardonnay grapes about one month before the other varieties.

Chardonnay harvest

The Spirit of Reserva Cabernet-Sauvignon

A journey for the bold

The Spirit of Reserva Cabernet-Sauvignon

Los Cerezos vineyard

When cherry trees (Los Cerezos in Spanish) and Malbec vines share the same piece of land.

🍇 ♥🍒

Los Cerezos vineyard

A Walk through the Vines

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Discover the estate and meet the vineyardists, a unique experience in the foothills of the Andes !

A Walk through the Vines

It is all about precision

Because the best grapes make the greatest wines, they are all carefully hand selected. 🍇

It is all about precision

Los Aromos vineyard

Our smallest parcel:  unique land for a unique Single Vineyard Cabernet-Sauvignon.

Los Aromos vineyard

We Source our Water from the Andes

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Our vineyards are located in semi-arid to arid areas. To allow the vines to grow, the use of irrigation is crucial. Thanks to an old system of channels, snowmelt waters are driven to the vineyards, for the plants to thrive.

We Source our Water from the Andes

Argentina’s pride

The Torrontès Riojano variety is native to Argentina. A pure product of high altitude.

Argentina’s pride

Las Compuertas award

In 2016 our Single Vineyard Las Compuertas Malbec received a silver medal from the magazine Decanter.

Las Compuertas award

An Argentinian classic

For the best empanadas in the world:

-In a traditional wood-fired oven for a few minutes

-Serve very hot. 🔥

An Argentinian classic

Harvest day

Here in Argentina, harvest season (“Vendimia”) occurs at the end our summer, from March to April. During this time we also celebrate World Malbec Day (April 17th).

Harvest day

A word on our Reserva Cabernet-Sauvignon

Check out what Master of Wine Tim Atkin has said about it.

A word on our Reserva Cabernet-Sauvignon

Fancy a glass of cab’?

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We brought a classic to offer you one of the most unique Cabernet-Sauvignons.

Fancy a glass of cab’?

An Award-Winning Malbec

Our pride: in 2016 our Reserva Malbec received a gold medal from the magazine Decanter. 🏅

An Award-Winning Malbec

A Grape at High Altitude

Our Torrontés vineyards in Cafayate, Salta are the highest of the entire estate.

A Grape at High Altitude

8 Exceptional Vineyards

From Lujan de Cuyo to Uco valley, our 8 unique terroirs offer a wide range of natural conditions, always aiming for excellence.

8 Exceptional Vineyards

A word on Parcel Los Cerezos Malbec

Check out what acclaimed wine critic James Suckling has said about it.

A word on Parcel Los Cerezos Malbec

100% French oak barrels

A quality oak barrel helps preserve the fruit’s natural aroma.

100% French oak barrels

From Vine to Table

It takes more than three years from the time the grapes are harvested before our wines are ready to be enjoyed. 

We recommend waiting a few more years for an even greater experience. 😉

From Vine to Table

A word on Parcel Los Castaños Malbec

Check out what acclaimed wine critic James Suckling has said about it.

A word on Parcel Los Castaños Malbec

Viticulture is for early birds

… cool temperatures at dawn help preserve the natural expression of our grapes, so all the grapes used for our Single Vineyards are handpicked very early in the morning.

Viticulture is for early birds

Las Compuertas vineyard

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This is our oldest vineyard. It was planted in 1929 and still produces the finest Malbec grapes. Forever young 💪🏻

Las Compuertas vineyard

The winemaking process

A quick focus on how we turn our grapes into wine. 


Terrazas de los Andes is a pioneering winery that has been leading the transformation and promotion of Argentinian wines around the world for more than 20 years. The building’s historical architecture is well-preserved, dates back to the late 1800s, and its facilities are equipped with the latest quality and safety technologies.

We are viticulturists and terroir experts first and winemakers second, which is why we are committed to a never-ending quest for the best grapes for each of our great wines. We have dedicated a large part of our history to studying and acquiring land among some of the most highly coveted terroirs in existence, including Las Compuertas and Perdriel in Luján de Cuyo and Altamira, Chacayes, Eugenio Bustos and Gualtallary in the Uco Valley.

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In keeping with this philosophy, all of our Reserva, Single Vineyard and Single Parcel wines are produced exclusively from our own grapes, which lets us systematically track and control the quality of their every aspect.

We believe that the winemaking process should be non-interventionist, with nature taking on a leading role. The quality of our wines consequently begins in the vineyard and is then enhanced by the know-how of our agronomists and enologists, who pay meticulous attention to every detail.

At Terrazas de los Andes, we uphold the human aspect of production, allowing us to aim for quality and consistently seek excellence, which means that we strive to take the utmost care of our hand-picked grapes. They are collected in low-capacity crates or bins, inspected individually on conveyor belts, destemmed using leading-edge equipment, and transferred to tanks to undergo a gentle maceration process that seeks to carefully extract the finest components of the skins and, ultimately, provide our wines with intensity, elegance and remarkable varietal character.

Finally, we age our Single Vineyard and Single Parcel wines in new French oak barrels and our Reserva wines in barrels that have been used one to four times.

Our entire process also meets the most stringent sustainability criteria from start to end. At Terrazas de los Andes, we believe that we can carry out wine production activities in harmony with both nature and man through use of solar panels, measured use of water and other natural resources, recycling of liquid and solid waste, certification to ISO standards and adoption of the strictest health and safety practices.

The winemaking process

Winemaking in Argentina

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Argentina, leading the cultivation of quality vineyards.


Argentina’s long-standing excellence in wine production is undeniable: as a winemaking country, Argentina enjoys the possibility of cultivating quality vineyards across the whole country. 

Mendoza and Salta are among the leading wine provinces in the country. Mendoza is regarded as the leader of the vast majority of wine production, and Salta is home to some of the world´s highest elevated vineyards.

To be brief, our uniqueness is shaped by three special features:
·       The high-altitude at which we plant our vines
·       The unique land on which we live.
·       The rich and diverse culture we inherited.

Now let us explain to you more precisely what winemaking in Argentina really means!



The treasure of the New World

Right here at Terrazas de los Andes , we are Argentinian, we are French, we are all vineyardists and work side-by-side every day. Each of us brought distinct and complementary know-hows from various experiences around the world, but all underpinned by a common passion to learn and innovate in a quest for the ultimate wine.

This is Argentina: a continuous mix of cultures inspired by the same values that drove our founders which contributes to shaping a unique and living identity.

We are the heirs of a long line of pioneers and adventurers, from the Spanish colonists who introduced the first vines in 1551 to the Italians, Spanish and French immigrants who came in the 1800’s to find a better life in Argentina. Developing the ancestral system of irrigation inherited from the Inca and Huarpe people, these pioneer civilizations imported European winemaking techniques and revolutionized local wine production.

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What makes Argentinian wines so special?

Some say it is about our character and passion and who are we to deny it? But the true treasure that confers its vibrant identity upon Argentinian wine is to be found in the astonishing specificities of the nature surrounding us.

It is about the mainland strip of vineyards that run along the base of the Andes lying between 800 and 1,600 meters (2,600 and 5249 feet) above sea level, providing them with intense flavor and freshness.

It is about the fresh melted-snow waters irrigating the vines and the scarce rainfall guaranteeing plants natural health.

It is about the unique variability of the soil enabling us to cultivate quality vineyards and confering on our wines the authentic characteristics of their different terroirs.

 Now let’s take a closer look at these two specific regions at the bedrock of Argentinian wine diversity



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Mendoza: the heart of Argentinian wine

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Our home. Mendoza province stands as the main winemaking region of Argentina, producing as much as 80% of the wine. Today it is one of the most prominent centers of the winemaking industry worldwide. If you want to walk the global wine route, you will have to visit us!  


It is along the historical Luján de Cuyo area to the Uco Valley in the South-West that we established most of our vineyards, enjoying a great diversity of altitude terroirs to produce the finest Malbec and a great number of varieties: Cabernet Sauvignon, Syrah, Merlot, Chardonnay…   

The Mendoza wine region in 3 facts: 

1.      Vineyards in the Mendoza province are located alongside a 150-mile strip of the Andes foothills, planted on terraces varying between 800 and 1,250 meters (2,600 and 3,900 feet) above sea level. It is thanks to the fresh air of the mountains that we can harness the hot dry climate of the region to produce the most special of wines.

2.      Rainfall is scarce, averaging just 200 mm per year. This is 2.5 times less than the Napa Valley (USA) and 5 times less than the Bordeaux wine region (France). This low humidity helps keep the vines healthy by nature, practically organic, with very limited disease treatment…

3.      Don’t expect to find a desert in Mendoza exactly, but it is definitely one of the most arid wine regions in the world. The soil has been shaped by thousands of years of mountain river deposits (mostly rocks and sand), making it hard for any organic element to survive. But when handled with care, the vines produce strong concentrated berries that give our wines their vivid flavor.

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Salta: an extreme harmony

When it comes to high-altitude wines, the Salta province (Northern Argentina) is only one step below the sky.

This winemaking province is famous for its icon white wine, a fruity grape only planted in this region that is used to make one of the finest and most recognizable white wines in the world. It is considered to be one of the most genuine products of Argentina.

 The Salta wine region in 3 facts:

1.      Vineyards in the region are located between 1,500 and 3,000 meters in altitude (5,500 to 10,000 feet), making it the highest grape-growing region in the world!

2.     Salta is all about extremes: it has one of the highest sun exposures in South America and coldest nights. It almost never rains but when it does massive storms quickly blow in.

 3.     You can find cactuses dotted between the vineyards! Obviously, under these conditions, effective irrigation is an important requisite for viticulture.

Winemaking in Argentina

The Malbec Adventure

Exploring the amazing odyssey of one of the most iconic Argentinian grapes.


It is a saga that can be traced back almost 2,000 years, a bond running between the Roman Empire and the high-altitude terraces of the Andes. Facing extinction in Europe, the Malbec grape variety found its new homeland in Argentina, where it rose from the ashes to become one of the flagships of the Argentina’s wine identity.

As it has been the case for centuries in France, today, it is considered among the 18 most noble grapes, its unique taste helping it to conquer the world once again.

So, allow us to walk you through the fascinating story of Malbec!



A key witness to European history

Sometimes called Côt or Auxerrois, Malbec’s spiritual home is located around the city of Cahors in southwest France.
During the Roman period, the region was already renowned for the quality of its wines. As their fame was growing and overshadowing Italian wines, in 92 AD, the Emperor Domitian ordered the destruction of the vines. The command was never followed for reasons every wine lover can imagine.

 In the Middle Ages, Malbec spread across Europe. In the 12th century, Eleanor of Aquitaine married Henry II, King of England and helped extend the wine’s fame throughout the kingdom, henceforth recognized as the “Black Wine of Cahors” for its deep plum-ebony tint.

The grape’s most glorious period coincided with the zenith of French influence over Europe during the reigns of Louis XIV and Louis XV. It spread to Northern European markets and Russia - Tsar Peter the Great was particularly smitten by it – to finally reach North-American shores in the 18th century.

 At the turn of the turbulent 19th century, Malbec started to decline due to the Franco-British competition limiting commercial exchanges. Despite all the historical turmoil, it was a microscopic pest – the infamous Phylloxera – that struck the “coup de grace”, destroying almost 100,000 acres of vineyards and putting a temporary end to the Malbec’s European odyssey.

 The story would soon resume in Argentina.


Rebirth in Argentina: a wine revolution

 Malbec loves the sun that provides its fruitiness, as well as the dryness of the soil. In Argentina, it was reborn and thrived on the high-altitude mountainside of the Andes.

 In the mid-19st century, French botanist Michel-Aimé Pouget travelled to South America with the intention of transforming the local wine industry by calling on French techniques and varieties.

He arrived in Mendoza in 1852 with “strains of various types, such as Cabernet Sauvignon and Pinot Noir; one of them was the Malbec grape”. At the time, he could never have imagined that the so-called “French grape” would find such a harmonious haven and go on to become the country’s emblem in less than a century.

 After the massive arrival of thousands of Italian, Spanish and French immigrants, Malbec production gradually gained in value and recognition; reaching 58,600 hectares (144,803 acres) in 1962 out of the country’s total of 259,800 hectares (641,979 acres).

 Today, Argentina dominates the world in Malbec production, with about 74,131 acres of vineyards and roughly 75% of global production.

 Every April 17th, we celebrate this glorious past during Malbec World Day and together raise our glasses to an even brighter future.

The Malbec Adventure

Precision viticulture: attaining the purest natural expression

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Because producing a great wine starts in the vineyards, discover how we select and work with ours.


There is one conviction that we all share here at the winery, which drives our efforts: a good wine comes from a good grape.

 Our quest for excellence begins with viticulture. Like an architect at his drawing board, we compose using the amazing natural resources of our land to obtain the kind of harmony for each variety which allows it to achieve its maximum expression.

 This means that we spend years deciphering every parcel’s uniqueness, its soil and the impact of altitude on its climate… to achieve a pioneering ambition: not to think in terms of a single terroir but as many terroirs as there are rows of vines. 

Now, let us tell you more about how precision viticulture works.



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But first things first, here is why terroir matters so much for us

Simply put, terroir is how the environment affects the taste of wine.
It is about 3 main elements for the vineyardist to work with:
-        The soil (the earth’s surface) and its geological composition
-        The climate, whether or not it is hot (it is in our case), the temperature variations, the rainfall, etc.
-        The terrain, which includes factors such as altitude, flora, water availability, etc.

 These are the major elements that determine a good vineyard and, as its end result, great wine. Therefore, as in any great terroirs of the world, knowing and understanding the terroir – in all its variability – is critical to adapting and improving viticultural practices specifically for each of them.

Ultimately, a terroir-centered approach enables us to influence the grape quality: ripeness, aroma… to produce the most precise and tasteful wines. 

On top of the terroir definition, there is one element in Terrazas de los Andes on which we have built our viticultural specificity: the altitude of the vineyards.



Understanding altitude

 Our vineyards are all located in the foothills of the Andes, making Terrazas de los Andes the highest estate in the Mendoza region. Their altitude varies between 980m (3,214 ft.) and 1,620m (5,315 ft.).

In our latitude, the climate is generally mild and the amazingly high sunshine hours enable the vines to thrive. Besides the prodigious panorama that high-altitude vineyards offer, the main benefit from this lofty location comes from the cold nights, slowing the grapes’ ripening process and keeping their acidity balanced.

Moreover, at altitude, the temperature drops by 1°C (34°F) for every 100 meters (328 ft.) higher up the slopes. Choosing the optimal elevation for each variety is our way of precisely monitoring the influence of climate on the quality of the grapes.

On top of climate and freshness, altitude in the Andes plays a crucial part in the definition of soil composition. The arid and rocky soil found here offers a low level of organic elements, forcing the vines’ roots to descend ever deeper in search of nutrients and hydration, so contributing to the intensity of the berries’ flavor.


Understanding all of our “micro-terroirs”

 Mapping each block and sub-block of our vineyards and their slightest variations, is critical to our capacity to adapt our viticulture practices proactively.

For instance, modern science has enabled us to measure precisely, row after row, every soil variation and fertility fluctuation, using “electro-conductivity” equipment.

As a result, we can tend to each micro-terroir and each vine in the most appropriate way instead of averaging them all out. This balance between each vine and its natural conditions allows us to start the harvest at the most optimal moment and ensure that the grapes in each of our wines attain their utmost expression.

Precision viticulture: attaining the purest natural expression

Chardonnay time at the Winery

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After sunset, light runs in the glasses :)

Chardonnay time at the Winery